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Ian Bostridge 2002

He does have a pretty face: imagine a young Oberon from A Midsummer’s Night Dream played as an ethereal elf with a boyish glint in his eye. But this elf can sing. Ian Bostridge lacks the sheer power of an operatic tenor,...

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The Civil War Muster

A team of horses pulling a cannon thundered through Ypsilanti's Riverside Park as their driver tried to rein them away from a microphone and two speakers near crowded bleachers. WHAM! BOOM! BAM! One speaker rolled under the...

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Crowbar Hotel

With timeless rhythms, accessible tunes, and words you can (usually) make out, Crowbar Hotel’s debut CD, Other Lives, eschews alt-rock tangents in favor of the deep roots of southern rock and urban blues-rock, with a...

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Green Wood Coffee House

The Green Wood Coffee House of the First United Methodist Church is on the elevated main floor, above a co-op preschool, of a small Green Road building that serves as FUMC's North Campus branch. On two Friday nights each...

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Christine Lavin

The problem with growing up — well, one of them — is that no one tells you stories anymore. That's why singer-songwriter Christine Lavin regularly packs them into concert halls from Andover to Anchorage. Adults...

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Alistair MacLeod

A large island in the middle of nowhere off the northeastern edge of mainland Nova Scotia, populated by the descendants of Scottish Highlanders fleeing the invading English and of British Loyalists fleeing the American...

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Babes in Toyland

"I wrote frantically on the train all the way so we could have a script when I got back," said Hal Roach, who produced Babes in Toyland, a 1934 film adaptation of the Victor Herbert operetta that is every bit as busy...

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Cedar Walton

Pianist Cedar Walton was one of many promising Bud Powell-inspired pianists working in New York when he joined Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers in 1961. He had already made a name for himself as a member of two of the finest...

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Vox

Honestly, it was about as exquisitely, sublimely beautiful a musical experience as I have had in a long, long time. I didn't go with high hopes. It was a cold and dismal October afternoon, and the rain had seeped through my...

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Steven Curtis Chapman

The youthful faithful already know all about Steven Curtis Chapman's appearance Thursday, March 14, at Hill Auditorium. Although contemporary Christian music doesn't register much on weekend things-to-do lists, he filled...

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Jim Roll

Jim Roll has long been known as a literate and sometimes witheringly honest folk-rock wordsmith, and on his third CD, Inhabiting the Ball, he raises the literary stakes by taking on noted novelists Denis Johnson and Rick Moody...

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Ambassadors of Rumba

Among fans of Cuban music, the city of Matanzas has long been known as a cultural mecca. Founded in 1693 by the Spanish as a port for the sugar cane industry, the city quickly became home to tens of thousands of African slaves....

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U-M Powwow

Asked to list their hometown's world-class attractions, most Ann Arborites could easily rattle off several, but very few would name one of Ann Arbor's most remarkable annual events: the U-M Powwow. Every March (March...

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Twyla Tharp Dance

Modern dance is a tricky term, often used as a catchphrase for nearly every nonclassical (read: nonballetic) theatrical dance style in Europe and America since the early twentieth century. Twyla Tharp challenges even that...

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Anne Waldman

Poet is almost too limiting a term to describe Anne Waldman: she seems to be a force of nature! She came from a family steeped in bohemian culture and moved quite easily into the artistic ferment of New York City in the...

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Cavafy’s world

Constantine Cavafy is the leading poet of modern Greek, although he never published a book in his lifetime or lived in Greece. He lived mostly in Alexandria, Egypt, a member of the Greek-speaking minority that was one of the...

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Uncle Earl

Uncle Earl is the brainchild of two women, K. C. Groves and Jo Serrapere. Serrapere writes blues-tinged originals and made local music headlines last December when she won a slot on the Hill Auditorium program of Garrison...

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Carlo Actis Dato

European improvised music is becoming well known in this country. German, Swedish, British, and Dutch jazz artists have found different routes to original styles, having long ago abandoned the imitation of American models, and...

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