Ann Arbor Weather:
Thursday December 05, 2019
Follow us: facebook twitter RSS feed

Everyone's a Critic

The Observer's culture blog

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

SNOWBOUND LANGUAGE, by Stephen Hiltner

photo of snowy landscape

SNOWBOUND LANGUAGE

"Isn't it snice?" asked the snaughter, looking out the window at the latest principitation. "Looks like snizzle to me," answered her snaddy with a frown. His snack was still snurting from snoveling the sniveway the snay before.

As they gazed out over the snooftops of their beloved snown, the sunlight danced on the snazzeleen snowscape, all snapples and snazeycakes after sneeks and sneeks of snow.

Snay after snay, Snaddy had snoveled the snidewalk so the sneighbors could sneeze through with their stroller. First had come the snuff, which was pretty enough, but soon followed the snizzle, the snain, and the dreaded snice. The snaughters had been snappy not to have snhool, but as the snours turned to snays, and the snays to sneeks, and the snow rose towards the snooftops, they grew sneary of being snowbound.

"I can't snake it any snore!," said the snife, sneepless after another snight of her snusband's snoring. She had snuffered the snings and snarrows of outrageous snortune one snight too many. "I'm snorry, Snowcakes," offered the snusband sneepishly.

All power in the sneighborhood had been snost. "Snead as a snoornail," declared Snaddy when his snellphone finally snied. "Maybe we could snask the sneighbors to call," said a snaughter. "But we don't even snow their snames," answered Snaddy, snooking out at the snarkening sky.

"I better take the snog for a slog before we get any more snow," said Snaddy, climbing out the second floor window, snog in snand. The snog, too, was losing touch with other sneighborhood snogs, as each snay's p-mails became buried under new-fallen snow. Snavigating the snarrow, snow-lined snidewalk, the snog sniffed disappointedly, then snarled at a snogger snotting by.

Seeing the sneighbors approaching, Snaddy hastened to cross the sneet, snarrowly snissing being snit by a snar. "Snow down!", he snouted at the sniver. Just the other snay, the snog had snarked suddenly at the sneighbors, snaring the snickens out of the sniny snot in the stroller.

The trees had long since become snees, and snice had turned many a weak-trunked snee into a snoodle. "Once a snoodle, always a snoodle," worried Snaddy, snooking at a birch snee arched completely over in front of a snouse. Dodging the snool snipping from the snees, Snaddy wondered how he had ever become the designated snog-slogger.

Finally they returned snome, the snog's fur filthy from the snirty snow lining the sneets. That evening, as they snat down to sneat some leftover snoup, sneary beyond snords, Snaddy wondered if he'd ever snortle again.

"Is it possible to be blinded by the snight if it's snight-time?" asked one snaughter, confused by the new snowbound language. "Why are we snalking like this?" asked the other. "I don't snow," answered Snaddy, "but it has something to do with snimate snange. Just snink good snoughts, and snope it snoon will be snover."


Posted by John Hilton at 1:04 p.m. | 0 comments Bookmark and Share


0 comments:

Post a comment:

SNOWBOUND LANGUAGE, by Stephen Hiltner:

Your e-mail address: (will not be shown)

Your name:

Please enter the word hello here, to show that you are a human and not a spam robot:

Blog comments are reviewed and edited by the Observer staff and are not guaranteed to be shown on the website.

Previous Posts


You might also like:

Adventures in the Humanities
A mom returns to high school.
Shelley Daily
Sports, Dancing, Nature, & Recreation
Ann Arbor, A Poem by Meaghan Prindle
Elected Officials
No Expectations
"You can't fault an artist for not giving what you expect," Kevin Gilmartin says.
Natalia Holtzman
Crime Map
A clickable, zoomable map
Red Shoes Finds a New Home
After adversity, Catherine Thursby reopens in Lamp Post Plaza
Sabine Bickford
Matthew VanBesien
Charting the cultural course at UMS
Linda R. Benson
"Sushi unrolled" at Poke Poke
When you're the fifth poke place in a year, a good tagline helps
Sabine Bickford
Food, Housing, and Assistance
Arbor Hospice
Pioneer theater
spark ann arbor