Ann Arbor Weather:
Thursday October 21, 2021
Follow us: facebook twitter RSS feed
Ralph Stanley

Ralph Stanley

Bluegrass creator on history's stage

by James M. Manheim

From the September, 2004 issue

I've seen and heard Ralph Stanley any number of times, once in a high school multipurpose room with the acoustics of a seashell. He's the greatest living exponent of bluegrass music, and just a few years ago, you'd look for him in the out-of-the-way places where this close-to-the-earth form of art music flourishes. He's played at the edges of Washtenaw County, in festivals near Whitmore Lake and Milan. But last January's Folk Festival was his first appearance in Ann Arbor in many years.

Stanley has played fewer festivals over the last couple of years, and not because of advancing age. Bill Monroe, the creator of bluegrass and the only other figure in the tradition with influence equal to Stanley's, was on the road right up to his death just shy of eighty-five. Instead it's because, after all these years, he's become venerated. As a little wave of interest in bluegrass crested a few years ago, rock producer T-Bone Burnett and some other influential people realized that one of the music's founding fathers was still alive and kicking. His rendition of "O Death" was the best thing about the hit film O Brother, Where Art Thou? At age seventy-seven, Stanley visited the big concert stages and outdoor summer music theaters, and with Burnett he recorded Ralph Stanley, his first solo album, backed not by his Clinch Mountain Boys but by a group of musicians specially selected for the project. Big-time publicity was applied to Ralph's inimitable tenor voice, which sounds much as it did forty years ago.

The upshot of all this was that Ralph Stanley realized he was an artist. He'd suspected as much before, billing himself consistently as Dr. Ralph Stanley after receiving an honorary degree from Lincoln Memorial University. But his Folk Festival set took things to a whole new level. He gave all the band members elaborate introductions, building up to his own, which would customarily be offered by a band member. But

...continued below...


Dr. Stanley did it himself, a flowery list of accomplishments and travels and honors. He spoke of himself in the third person, like the Wizard of Oz.

The music he made lived up to that promise. For Ralph Stanley, he and Burnett were inspired to record songs that were old even when Stanley first learned them. At the Folk Festival, he did an unaccompanied ballad, and for the finale he led the assembled artists and the audience in "Amazing Grace" by "lining it out" — singing and ornamenting each line as a preacher or song leader would have in a church long ago, before printed hymnals and musical notation took hold.

It all makes you wonder what Ralph Stanley will bring to the Ark on Friday, September 24. He'll have a whole evening in which to lay out the case for the recognition he has so long deserved. When great artists realize late in their careers that that's what they are, it's worth paying attention to what comes next.     (end of article)

[Originally published in September, 2004.]

 


 
Bookmark and Share
Print Comment E-mail

You might also like:

Jimmy Hoffa at the Law Quad
After Bobby Kennedy castigated the Teamsters' leader, students snuck him in the window.
Donnelly Wright Hadden
Raising Funds to Raise Spirits.
An online telethon for suicide prevention
Davi Napoleon
Bars And Grills in Dexter
My Neighborhood: Lawton
Pittsfield builds a mini-downtown
Cynthia Furlong Reynolds
Ann Arbor's Forgotten Movie Star, by Tim Athan
Superconductors
The A2SO's search for a new music director will play out in public this season.
arwulf arwulf
Finding a Farmers' Market
How specialized sellers from near and far pick their spots.
Micheline Maynard, with research by L.R. Nunez
Going Cashless
"Please use our ATM."
Eve Silberman
Halloween City
Returns to Arborland
Micheline Maynard
What's in a Park?
Sixty years of memories at Vets
Lewis H. Clark
a2view the Ann Arbor Observer's weekly email newsletter