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Calendar of Events

Films

Feature films and documentaries.





 
Who wrote this?   Ann Arbor Observer tree logo Observer editors    community member community members
18

Monday


March 2013
 4, 6:15, & 8:30 p.m. 

"Happy People: A Year in the Taiga": Michigan Theater.

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(Werner Herzog & Dmitry Vasyukov, 2010). Documentary about the indigenous people living in Bakhtia in the heart of the Siberian Taiga whose daily lives have barely changed over the last century.
Michigan Theater. Tickets $10 (children under 12, students with ID, seniors age 55 & older, & U.S. veterans, $8; MTF members, $7.50; films before 6 p.m., $7). michtheater.org. 668-TIME. [map]
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 4:15 p.m. 

"Amour": Michigan Theater.

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(Michael Haneke, 2012). Drama set in Paris about 2 retired music teachers whose marriage is tested when the woman has an attack. French, subtitles.
Michigan Theater. Tickets: 10 (children under 12, students with ID, seniors age 55 & older, & U.S. veterans, $8; MTF members, $7.50; films before 6 p.m., $7). 668-TIME. michtheater.org. [map]
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 7 p.m. 

"Dumb and Dumber": Michigan Theater Foundation.

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(Peter Farrelly, 1994). The adventures of two idiot buddies on a cross-country trip. Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels.
7 p.m., Michigan Theater. $10 (children under 12, students with ID, seniors age 55 & older, & U.S. veterans, $8; MTF members, $7.50.) 668-TIME. [map]
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 7:30 p.m.  Free! 

AAWA Speakers Program: Ann Arbor Women Artists.

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Brenda Olebaum, President of MI Women's Caucus for Art, will give an introduction for the showing of the "Women Art Revolution" http://womenartrevolution.com/index.php
"Women Art Revolution" movie for Women's History Month)
Ann Arbor Women Artists, 4844 Jackson Road Suite 100. Free. b.goodsitt@comcast.net http://annarborwomenartists.org [map]
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 7:30 p.m.  Free! 

"Women Art Revolution": Ann Arbor Women Artists.

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Michigan Women's Caucus for Art president Brenda Oelbaum introduces and shows Lynn Hershman Leeson's 2010 documentary with rare archival footage and interviews with leading women artists about the Feminist Art Movement.
7:30 p.m., 4844 Jackson Rd. (suite 100). Free. 996-2551. [map]
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19

Tuesday


March 2013
 6-10 p.m. 

51st Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival.

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Mar. 19-24. The oldest and one of the most prestigious film festivals in North America features 6 days of film screenings, panel discussions, and parties that culminate in screenings of the award-winning films on Mar. 24. The competition showcases new experimental and independent 16-mm, 35-mm, and digital films and videos in a wide range of genres and of generally high quality. Past contributors have included Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Brian De Palma.



Mar. 19: Opening Night. The festival kicks off tonight with screenings of independent short films, including animation, documentary, narrative, and experimental films, as well as the North American premiere of Da Vinci, Yuri Ancarani's film, set in an operating room, that depicts a surgical procedure performed by robots controlled by a physician. Preceded from 6-8 p.m. by a gala reception ($35; members, students, & seniors, $25; screening only, $9) with music spun by DJ Jeremy Wheeler. Also, open bar & appetizers from local restaurants. Also, a "Backstage Fundraiser Dinner" from 6-8 p.m. ($150). 8-10 p.m.



Mar. 20: Polish animation shorts curated by festival judge Marcin Gizycki. FREE, noon. "Films in Competition " (4:30 p.m.), including The Poor Stockinger, the Luddite Cropper and the Deluded Followers of Joanna Southcott, Luke Fowler's film that combines archive footage and new material in a meditation on the Marxist critic, historian, and activist E.P. Thompson who taught literature and social history to adults in the industrial towns of northern England. The program begins with Nathaniel Dorsky's elegiac short August and After "Psychedelic Visions and Expanded Consciousness: Los Angeles in the 60s and 70s" (7 p.m.), hyperkinetic experimental films and animation from the late 1960s and early 1970s. "Films in Competition 1" (7:15 p.m.), including Bill Brown's Memorial Land--about homemade 9/11 memorials--and other experimental, documentary, and animated films. "People's Park & Ernst Karel" (9:15 p.m.). Karel, a sound artist and composer who made the soundtrack for People's Park, performs before a screening of Libbie Cohn and J.P. Sniadecki's single-shot documentary that winds its way through a famous urban park in Chengdu, China. "Out Night: History, Glamor, Magic" (9:30 p.m.), includes films in competition that are inspired by the mythologies and artifice of Hollywood and revolve around queer/trans issues. Films are followed by an after party at the autBar (11 p.m.-2 a.m.), with fire pits in the courtyard and free appetizers.



Mar. 21: Films chosen by festival judge Laida Lertxundi, including her short 2012 experimental soundscape The Room Called Heaven, as well as films by Hollis Frampton, Bruce Baillie, and Morgan Fisher. FREE, noon. "Critical Means #1," a panel discussion on the current state of film criticism and writing. FREE, 2:30 p.m. Talk by legendary documentarian Ken Burns. FREE, 5:10 p.m. "Films in Competition 3" (7 p.m.), including recent animation, experimental, and documentary films. Leviathan (7:15 p.m.), Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel's experimental, impressionistic documentary about commercial fishing. With an appearance by soundtrack creator Ernst Karel. "Suzan Pitt Retrospective Program One" "Films in Competition 2" (9:30 p.m.), including the North American premieres of Takashi Makino's epic abstract film 2012 and Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt's Some Part of Us Will Have Become, a sci-fi film from the perspective of a robot who's witnessing a massive man made disaster. Also, Passage, Madison Brookshire's double 16mm film that operates as a meditation on color and sound, with music by composer Tashi Wada. Other shorts TBA. Films are followed by an after party at the Ravens Club (11:30 p.m.-2 a.m.).



Mar. 22: Films by critically acclaimed Virginia based artist (and festival judge) Kevin Jerome Everson, including the world premiere of Rhinoceros. FREE, noon. "Critical Means #2," a continuation of the panel discussion on Mar. 21 (see above). FREE, noon. "Polish Avant Garde Animation Films" (5 p.m.), including Jan Lenica's 1963 stop-motion masterpiece Labyrinth, Zbigniew Rybczynski's 1975 short New Book, and Tango, Rybczynski's Oscar-winning 1980 short that operates as a collage of people performing repeated patterns. Feature-length film TBA (7 p.m.). "Films in Competition 4" (7:30 p.m.): Kathryn Ramey's WEST: What I know about her, an experimental documentary about her ancestor Elizabeth Crandall Perry, an adventurer and midwife. I Remember: A Film about Joe Brainard, Matt Wolf's documentary about the late artist Brainard and his memoir poem "I Remember." The Mutability of All Things and the Possibility of Changing Some, Anna Marziano's film that explores human adaptability in the face of catastrophe. Hope Tucker's Handful of Dust. "Films by Pat O'Neill" (9:30 p.m.). Acclaimed avant-garde filmmaker O'Neill is in attendance for this screening of several of his shorts from the late 1960s to the present. He is known for his innovative optical techniques. "Animated Films in Competition" (9:45 p.m.). Recent animated shorts by Emily Hubley, Maureen Selwood, Maya Erdelyi, Meejin Hong, Shin Hashimoto, Kevin Eskew, and others. The films are followed by an after party at the Bar at 327 Braun Ct. (11 p.m.-2 a.m.), with a live audiovisual performance by the Brooklyn duo Synthhumpers.



Mar. 23: Your Day Is My Night (11 a.m.), Lynne Sachs' documentary, part of the AAFF competition, in which residents of New York City's Chinatown tell their stories of personal and political upheaval. Central Park Five (noon), Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon's documentary that tells the story of 5 black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were arrested in 1989 and later wrongfully convicted of raping a white woman in Central Park. Followed by a discussion with Ken Burns, Raymond Santana (one of the "Five"), and Northwestern Center on Wrongful Convictions director Steve Drizin. "Films in Competition 5" (1 p.m.), including new films by Ana Vaz and Ben Rivers, the North American premiere of Stephen Connolly's Zabriskie Point (Redacted)--an impressionistic documentary that combines images of the eponymous location of Antonioni's 1970 film Zabriskie Point with contemporary research on the location and the film--and Bette Gordon and James Benning's 1975 conceptual bicentennial masterpiece The United States of America. Water and Power (4 p.m.), an award-winning 1990 film that combines visually and aurally dense tableaux with advanced motional control, optical printing, and animation techniques to depict the complex battle for natural resources waged between L.A. and the Owens Valley. Director Pat O'Neill is in attendance. "Films in Competition 6" (3:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, and narrative films by Jesse McClean, Lori Felker, and James Lowne, as well as Circle in the Sand, Michael Robinson's 2012 film, set in the near future during a 2nd American civil war, that follows a band of exiled political prisoners and their supervising soldiers who live in the ruins of a seaside military fort. "Suzan Pitt Retrospective Program Two" (7 p.m.). Second of two screenings of films by celebrated animator Pitt, who is in attendance. The program is highlighted by the world premiere of her latest film, Pinball "Films in Competition 7" (7:15 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. Suitcase of Love and Shame (9:15 p.m.). World premiere of this film that reconstructs a mesmerizing and erotic love story based on 60 hours of reel-to-reel 1960s audiotape (discovered in a suitcase) that chronicles the details of an adulterous affair between a Midwestern woman and her lover. Director Jane Gillooly is in attendance. "Films in Competition 8" (9:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. The films are followed by a FREE after party at the Last Word (301 W. Huron) from 11 p.m.-2 a.m.



Mar. 24: "Films in Competition 9," including animated and experimental films appropriate for kids ages 6 and up. $5, 11 a.m. "Regional Films in Competition," including narrative, experimental, and documentary films made in Michigan. $5, 11 a.m. "Music Video in Competition." FREE, UMMA Auditorium (525 S. State), noon. "Films in Competition 10" (1 p.m.), including new documentary and experimental films by Dani Leventhal, Mike Hoolboom, and others, as well as Spend It All, Les Blank's 1971 portrait of Cajun culture. The Radiant (1:30 p.m.), the Otolith Group's film, part of the AAFF competition, that explores the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake that triggered a tsunami and contributed to the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. Our Nixon (3:30 p.m.), H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and Dwight Chapin's documentary, part of the AAFF competition, that compiles previously unseen archival footage of Nixon's presidency, filmed by White House aides on Super 8 home movie cameras and subsequently seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation. "Award Program 1" (6 p.m.). "Award Program 2" (8 p.m.). Followed by an after party (10 p.m.-1 a.m.) at Arbor Brewing Company.

.
Michigan Theater (unless otherwise noted). Tickets: $95 (members, students, & seniors, $80) for the entire festival & $55 (members, students, & seniors, $45) for weekend passes in advance at aafilmfest.org, and $9 (students, seniors, & members, $7; midnight movies, $6) per evening show at the door. 995-5356. [map]
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20

Wednesday


March 2013
 Noon-11 p.m. 

51st Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival.

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Mar. 19-24. The oldest and one of the most prestigious film festivals in North America features 6 days of film screenings, panel discussions, and parties that culminate in screenings of the award-winning films on Mar. 24. The competition showcases new experimental and independent 16-mm, 35-mm, and digital films and videos in a wide range of genres and of generally high quality. Past contributors have included Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Brian De Palma.



Mar. 20: Polish animation shorts curated by festival judge Marcin Gizycki. FREE, noon. "Films in Competition " (4:30 p.m.), including The Poor Stockinger, the Luddite Cropper and the Deluded Followers of Joanna Southcott, Luke Fowler's film that combines archive footage and new material in a meditation on the Marxist critic, historian, and activist E.P. Thompson who taught literature and social history to adults in the industrial towns of northern England. The program begins with Nathaniel Dorsky's elegiac short August and After "Psychedelic Visions and Expanded Consciousness: Los Angeles in the 60s and 70s" (7 p.m.), hyperkinetic experimental films and animation from the late 1960s and early 1970s. "Films in Competition 1" (7:15 p.m.), including Bill Brown's Memorial Land--about homemade 9/11 memorials--and other experimental, documentary, and animated films. "People's Park & Ernst Karel" (9:15 p.m.). Karel, a sound artist and composer who made the soundtrack for People's Park, performs before a screening of Libbie Cohn and J.P. Sniadecki's single-shot documentary that winds its way through a famous urban park in Chengdu, China. "Out Night: History, Glamor, Magic" (9:30 p.m.), includes films in competition that are inspired by the mythologies and artifice of Hollywood and revolve around queer/trans issues. Films are followed by an after party at the autBar (11 p.m.-2 a.m.), with fire pits in the courtyard and free appetizers.



Mar. 21: Films chosen by festival judge Laida Lertxundi, including her short 2012 experimental soundscape The Room Called Heaven, as well as films by Hollis Frampton, Bruce Baillie, and Morgan Fisher. FREE, noon. "Critical Means #1," a panel discussion on the current state of film criticism and writing. FREE, 2:30 p.m. Talk by legendary documentarian Ken Burns. FREE, 5:10 p.m. "Films in Competition 3" (7 p.m.), including recent animation, experimental, and documentary films. Leviathan (7:15 p.m.), Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel's experimental, impressionistic documentary about commercial fishing. With an appearance by soundtrack creator Ernst Karel. "Suzan Pitt Retrospective Program One" "Films in Competition 2" (9:30 p.m.), including the North American premieres of Takashi Makino's epic abstract film 2012 and Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt's Some Part of Us Will Have Become, a sci-fi film from the perspective of a robot who's witnessing a massive man made disaster. Also, Passage, Madison Brookshire's double 16mm film that operates as a meditation on color and sound, with music by composer Tashi Wada. Other shorts TBA. Films are followed by an after party at the Ravens Club (11:30 p.m.-2 a.m.).



Mar. 22: Films by critically acclaimed Virginia based artist (and festival judge) Kevin Jerome Everson, including the world premiere of Rhinoceros. FREE, noon. "Critical Means #2," a continuation of the panel discussion on Mar. 21 (see above). FREE, noon. "Polish Avant Garde Animation Films" (5 p.m.), including Jan Lenica's 1963 stop-motion masterpiece Labyrinth, Zbigniew Rybczynski's 1975 short New Book, and Tango, Rybczynski's Oscar-winning 1980 short that operates as a collage of people performing repeated patterns. Feature-length film TBA (7 p.m.). "Films in Competition 4" (7:30 p.m.): Kathryn Ramey's WEST: What I know about her, an experimental documentary about her ancestor Elizabeth Crandall Perry, an adventurer and midwife. I Remember: A Film about Joe Brainard, Matt Wolf's documentary about the late artist Brainard and his memoir poem "I Remember." The Mutability of All Things and the Possibility of Changing Some, Anna Marziano's film that explores human adaptability in the face of catastrophe. Hope Tucker's Handful of Dust. "Films by Pat O'Neill" (9:30 p.m.). Acclaimed avant-garde filmmaker O'Neill is in attendance for this screening of several of his shorts from the late 1960s to the present. He is known for his innovative optical techniques. "Animated Films in Competition" (9:45 p.m.). Recent animated shorts by Emily Hubley, Maureen Selwood, Maya Erdelyi, Meejin Hong, Shin Hashimoto, Kevin Eskew, and others. The films are followed by an after party at the Bar at 327 Braun Ct. (11 p.m.-2 a.m.), with a live audiovisual performance by the Brooklyn duo Synthhumpers.



Mar. 23: Your Day Is My Night (11 a.m.), Lynne Sachs' documentary, part of the AAFF competition, in which residents of New York City's Chinatown tell their stories of personal and political upheaval. Central Park Five (noon), Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon's documentary that tells the story of 5 black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were arrested in 1989 and later wrongfully convicted of raping a white woman in Central Park. Followed by a discussion with Ken Burns, Raymond Santana (one of the "Five"), and Northwestern Center on Wrongful Convictions director Steve Drizin. "Films in Competition 5" (1 p.m.), including new films by Ana Vaz and Ben Rivers, the North American premiere of Stephen Connolly's Zabriskie Point (Redacted)--an impressionistic documentary that combines images of the eponymous location of Antonioni's 1970 film Zabriskie Point with contemporary research on the location and the film--and Bette Gordon and James Benning's 1975 conceptual bicentennial masterpiece The United States of America. Water and Power (4 p.m.), an award-winning 1990 film that combines visually and aurally dense tableaux with advanced motional control, optical printing, and animation techniques to depict the complex battle for natural resources waged between L.A. and the Owens Valley. Director Pat O'Neill is in attendance. "Films in Competition 6" (3:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, and narrative films by Jesse McClean, Lori Felker, and James Lowne, as well as Circle in the Sand, Michael Robinson's 2012 film, set in the near future during a 2nd American civil war, that follows a band of exiled political prisoners and their supervising soldiers who live in the ruins of a seaside military fort. "Suzan Pitt Retrospective Program Two" (7 p.m.). Second of two screenings of films by celebrated animator Pitt, who is in attendance. The program is highlighted by the world premiere of her latest film, Pinball "Films in Competition 7" (7:15 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. Suitcase of Love and Shame (9:15 p.m.). World premiere of this film that reconstructs a mesmerizing and erotic love story based on 60 hours of reel-to-reel 1960s audiotape (discovered in a suitcase) that chronicles the details of an adulterous affair between a Midwestern woman and her lover. Director Jane Gillooly is in attendance. "Films in Competition 8" (9:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. The films are followed by a FREE after party at the Last Word (301 W. Huron) from 11 p.m.-2 a.m.



Mar. 24: "Films in Competition 9," including animated and experimental films appropriate for kids ages 6 and up. $5, 11 a.m. "Regional Films in Competition," including narrative, experimental, and documentary films made in Michigan. $5, 11 a.m. "Music Video in Competition." FREE, UMMA Auditorium (525 S. State), noon. "Films in Competition 10" (1 p.m.), including new documentary and experimental films by Dani Leventhal, Mike Hoolboom, and others, as well as Spend It All, Les Blank's 1971 portrait of Cajun culture. The Radiant (1:30 p.m.), the Otolith Group's film, part of the AAFF competition, that explores the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake that triggered a tsunami and contributed to the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. Our Nixon (3:30 p.m.), H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and Dwight Chapin's documentary, part of the AAFF competition, that compiles previously unseen archival footage of Nixon's presidency, filmed by White House aides on Super 8 home movie cameras and subsequently seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation. "Award Program 1" (6 p.m.). "Award Program 2" (8 p.m.). Followed by an after party (10 p.m.-1 a.m.) at Arbor Brewing Company.

.
Michigan Theater (unless otherwise noted). Tickets: $95 (members, students, & seniors, $80) for the entire festival & $55 (members, students, & seniors, $45) for weekend passes in advance at aafilmfest.org, and $9 (students, seniors, & members, $7; midnight movies, $6) per evening show at the door. 995-5356. [map]
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 7 p.m.  Free! 

Ann Arbor Docu Fest.

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Feb. 13: When the Drum Is Beating (Whitney Dow, 2011). Documentary about the history of Haiti from independence from France to the 2010 earthquake, set to the music Haiti's most celebrated big band, Septentrional.

Feb. 20: Urban Roots (Henry Stephens, 2007). (Mark MacInnis, 2011). Documentary about the spontaneous emergence of urban farming in Detroit.

Feb. 27: The Great Culling: Our Water (Paul Wittennberger, 2010). Documentary about heavy metal toxicity and its direct relationship with the current rise in neurological disorders.

Mar. 6: Surviving Progress (Mathieu Roy & Harold Crooks, 2011). Documentary exploring whether contemporary global civilization is caught in a "progress trap" that, in his best-selling A Short History of Progress, Ronald Wright argues destroyed past civilizations.

Mar. 13: Green Fire (Ann & Steve Dunsky and Dave Steinke, 2011). Documentary about the pioneering 20th-century conservationist Aldo Leopold.

Mar. 20: Tears of Gaza (Vibeke Lokkeberg, 2010). Documentary about the impact of contemporary warfare that follows 3 children though the 3-week 2008-2009 Gaza War and its aftermath.

Mar. 27: Bitter Pill (Vivek Palavali, 2012) Director Palavali, a Flint neurosurgeon, introduces his documentary (bitterpilldoc.com) about the deteriorating American health care system.

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7 p.m., Elmo's Hideaway, lower level of Elmo's T-Shirts, 220 S. Main, Free. 662-5414. [map]
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 7:30 p.m.  Free! 

Lenten Film Series: Canterbury House.

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Feb. 20: "The Big Parade" (King Vidor, 1925). Classic WWI film that blends spectacular, singularly credible battle scenes with an irresistibly charming romance between a young French woman (Renee Adoree) and the American soldier (John Gilbert) who, in one of the films's most famous scenes, teaches her how to chew gum. Also, film scholar Mary Tubbs gives an introductory talk on "A Mechanized Art for a Mechanized War: Glamor and Trauma in The Big Parade" and leads a discussion of the film.

Feb. 27: "Le Grande Illusion" (Jean Renoir, 1937). WWI film about 2 French soldiers who repeatedly attempt to escape a German POW camp until they're sent to an impenetrable fortress that seems impossible to escape. French, German, English, Russian; subtitles. Also, Tubbs gives an introductory talk on "Looking Forward by Looking Back, Part 1: Race and Class in Le Grande Illusion" and leads a discussion of the film.

Mar. 6: "The 49th Parallel" (Michael Powell, 1941). A WWII German U-boat, stranded in northern Canada, tries to escape to the still-neutral U.S. Also, Tubbs gives an introductory talk on "Invasion-Free since 1812: Walking with the Enemy and Talking Freedom in The 49th Parallel" and leads a discussion of the film.

Mar. 13: "The Deer Hunter" (Michael Cimino, 1978). 3 Pennsylvania factory workers end up in a Vietcong POW camp. Robert De Niro & Christopher Walken. Also, Tubbs gives an introductory talk on "Over Here Over There: Meanings of Survival in The Deer Hunter" and leads a discussion of the film.

Mar. 20: "Catch-22" (Mike Nichols, 1970). Film based on Joseph Heller's classic WWII black humor novel about a bombardier who tries to escape the insanity of the war. Also, Tubbs gives an introductory talk on "Looking Forward by Looking Back, Part 2: An Enemy for a New Age in Catch-22" and leads a discussion of the film.

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7:30 p.m., Canterbury House, 721 E. Huron. Free. 764-3152. [map]
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21

Thursday


March 2013
 Noon-11:30 p.m. 

51st Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival.

  Ann Arbor Observer tree logo   < less

Mar. 19-24. The oldest and one of the most prestigious film festivals in North America features 6 days of film screenings, panel discussions, and parties that culminate in screenings of the award-winning films on Mar. 24. The competition showcases new experimental and independent 16-mm, 35-mm, and digital films and videos in a wide range of genres and of generally high quality. Past contributors have included Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Brian De Palma.



Mar. 21: Films chosen by festival judge Laida Lertxundi, including her short 2012 experimental soundscape The Room Called Heaven, as well as films by Hollis Frampton, Bruce Baillie, and Morgan Fisher. FREE, noon. "Critical Means #1," a panel discussion on the current state of film criticism and writing. FREE, 2:30 p.m. Talk by legendary documentarian Ken Burns. FREE, 5:10 p.m. "Films in Competition 3" (7 p.m.), including recent animation, experimental, and documentary films. Leviathan (7:15 p.m.), Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel's experimental, impressionistic documentary about commercial fishing. With an appearance by soundtrack creator Ernst Karel. "Suzan Pitt Retrospective Program One" "Films in Competition 2" (9:30 p.m.), including the North American premieres of Takashi Makino's epic abstract film 2012 and Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt's Some Part of Us Will Have Become, a sci-fi film from the perspective of a robot who's witnessing a massive man made disaster. Also, Passage, Madison Brookshire's double 16mm film that operates as a meditation on color and sound, with music by composer Tashi Wada. Other shorts TBA. Films are followed by an after party at the Ravens Club (11:30 p.m.-2 a.m.).



Mar. 22: Films by critically acclaimed Virginia based artist (and festival judge) Kevin Jerome Everson, including the world premiere of Rhinoceros. FREE, noon. "Critical Means #2," a continuation of the panel discussion on Mar. 21 (see above). FREE, noon. "Polish Avant Garde Animation Films" (5 p.m.), including Jan Lenica's 1963 stop-motion masterpiece Labyrinth, Zbigniew Rybczynski's 1975 short New Book, and Tango, Rybczynski's Oscar-winning 1980 short that operates as a collage of people performing repeated patterns. Feature-length film TBA (7 p.m.). "Films in Competition 4" (7:30 p.m.): Kathryn Ramey's WEST: What I know about her, an experimental documentary about her ancestor Elizabeth Crandall Perry, an adventurer and midwife. I Remember: A Film about Joe Brainard, Matt Wolf's documentary about the late artist Brainard and his memoir poem "I Remember." The Mutability of All Things and the Possibility of Changing Some, Anna Marziano's film that explores human adaptability in the face of catastrophe. Hope Tucker's Handful of Dust. "Films by Pat O'Neill" (9:30 p.m.). Acclaimed avant-garde filmmaker O'Neill is in attendance for this screening of several of his shorts from the late 1960s to the present. He is known for his innovative optical techniques. "Animated Films in Competition" (9:45 p.m.). Recent animated shorts by Emily Hubley, Maureen Selwood, Maya Erdelyi, Meejin Hong, Shin Hashimoto, Kevin Eskew, and others. The films are followed by an after party at the Bar at 327 Braun Ct. (11 p.m.-2 a.m.), with a live audiovisual performance by the Brooklyn duo Synthhumpers.



Mar. 23: Your Day Is My Night (11 a.m.), Lynne Sachs' documentary, part of the AAFF competition, in which residents of New York City's Chinatown tell their stories of personal and political upheaval. Central Park Five (noon), Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon's documentary that tells the story of 5 black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were arrested in 1989 and later wrongfully convicted of raping a white woman in Central Park. Followed by a discussion with Ken Burns, Raymond Santana (one of the "Five"), and Northwestern Center on Wrongful Convictions director Steve Drizin. "Films in Competition 5" (1 p.m.), including new films by Ana Vaz and Ben Rivers, the North American premiere of Stephen Connolly's Zabriskie Point (Redacted)--an impressionistic documentary that combines images of the eponymous location of Antonioni's 1970 film Zabriskie Point with contemporary research on the location and the film--and Bette Gordon and James Benning's 1975 conceptual bicentennial masterpiece The United States of America. Water and Power (4 p.m.), an award-winning 1990 film that combines visually and aurally dense tableaux with advanced motional control, optical printing, and animation techniques to depict the complex battle for natural resources waged between L.A. and the Owens Valley. Director Pat O'Neill is in attendance. "Films in Competition 6" (3:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, and narrative films by Jesse McClean, Lori Felker, and James Lowne, as well as Circle in the Sand, Michael Robinson's 2012 film, set in the near future during a 2nd American civil war, that follows a band of exiled political prisoners and their supervising soldiers who live in the ruins of a seaside military fort. "Suzan Pitt Retrospective Program Two" (7 p.m.). Second of two screenings of films by celebrated animator Pitt, who is in attendance. The program is highlighted by the world premiere of her latest film, Pinball "Films in Competition 7" (7:15 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. Suitcase of Love and Shame (9:15 p.m.). World premiere of this film that reconstructs a mesmerizing and erotic love story based on 60 hours of reel-to-reel 1960s audiotape (discovered in a suitcase) that chronicles the details of an adulterous affair between a Midwestern woman and her lover. Director Jane Gillooly is in attendance. "Films in Competition 8" (9:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. The films are followed by a FREE after party at the Last Word (301 W. Huron) from 11 p.m.-2 a.m.



Mar. 24: "Films in Competition 9," including animated and experimental films appropriate for kids ages 6 and up. $5, 11 a.m. "Regional Films in Competition," including narrative, experimental, and documentary films made in Michigan. $5, 11 a.m. "Music Video in Competition." FREE, UMMA Auditorium (525 S. State), noon. "Films in Competition 10" (1 p.m.), including new documentary and experimental films by Dani Leventhal, Mike Hoolboom, and others, as well as Spend It All, Les Blank's 1971 portrait of Cajun culture. The Radiant (1:30 p.m.), the Otolith Group's film, part of the AAFF competition, that explores the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake that triggered a tsunami and contributed to the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. Our Nixon (3:30 p.m.), H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and Dwight Chapin's documentary, part of the AAFF competition, that compiles previously unseen archival footage of Nixon's presidency, filmed by White House aides on Super 8 home movie cameras and subsequently seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation. "Award Program 1" (6 p.m.). "Award Program 2" (8 p.m.). Followed by an after party (10 p.m.-1 a.m.) at Arbor Brewing Company.

.
Michigan Theater (unless otherwise noted). Tickets: $95 (members, students, & seniors, $80) for the entire festival & $55 (members, students, & seniors, $45) for weekend passes in advance at aafilmfest.org, and $9 (students, seniors, & members, $7; midnight movies, $6) per evening show at the door. 995-5356. [map]
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22

Friday


March 2013
 Noon-11 p.m. 

51st Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival.

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Mar. 19-24. The oldest and one of the most prestigious film festivals in North America features 6 days of film screenings, panel discussions, and parties that culminate in screenings of the award-winning films on Mar. 24. The competition showcases new experimental and independent 16-mm, 35-mm, and digital films and videos in a wide range of genres and of generally high quality. Past contributors have included Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Brian De Palma.



Mar. 22: Films by critically acclaimed Virginia based artist (and festival judge) Kevin Jerome Everson, including the world premiere of Rhinoceros. FREE, noon. "Critical Means #2," a continuation of the panel discussion on Mar. 21 (see above). FREE, noon. "Polish Avant Garde Animation Films" (5 p.m.), including Jan Lenica's 1963 stop-motion masterpiece Labyrinth, Zbigniew Rybczynski's 1975 short New Book, and Tango, Rybczynski's Oscar-winning 1980 short that operates as a collage of people performing repeated patterns. Feature-length film TBA (7 p.m.). "Films in Competition 4" (7:30 p.m.): Kathryn Ramey's WEST: What I know about her, an experimental documentary about her ancestor Elizabeth Crandall Perry, an adventurer and midwife. I Remember: A Film about Joe Brainard, Matt Wolf's documentary about the late artist Brainard and his memoir poem "I Remember." The Mutability of All Things and the Possibility of Changing Some, Anna Marziano's film that explores human adaptability in the face of catastrophe. Hope Tucker's Handful of Dust. "Films by Pat O'Neill" (9:30 p.m.). Acclaimed avant-garde filmmaker O'Neill is in attendance for this screening of several of his shorts from the late 1960s to the present. He is known for his innovative optical techniques. "Animated Films in Competition" (9:45 p.m.). Recent animated shorts by Emily Hubley, Maureen Selwood, Maya Erdelyi, Meejin Hong, Shin Hashimoto, Kevin Eskew, and others. The films are followed by an after party at the Bar at 327 Braun Ct. (11 p.m.-2 a.m.), with a live audiovisual performance by the Brooklyn duo Synthhumpers.



Mar. 23: Your Day Is My Night (11 a.m.), Lynne Sachs' documentary, part of the AAFF competition, in which residents of New York City's Chinatown tell their stories of personal and political upheaval. Central Park Five (noon), Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon's documentary that tells the story of 5 black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were arrested in 1989 and later wrongfully convicted of raping a white woman in Central Park. Followed by a discussion with Ken Burns, Raymond Santana (one of the "Five"), and Northwestern Center on Wrongful Convictions director Steve Drizin. "Films in Competition 5" (1 p.m.), including new films by Ana Vaz and Ben Rivers, the North American premiere of Stephen Connolly's Zabriskie Point (Redacted)--an impressionistic documentary that combines images of the eponymous location of Antonioni's 1970 film Zabriskie Point with contemporary research on the location and the film--and Bette Gordon and James Benning's 1975 conceptual bicentennial masterpiece The United States of America. Water and Power (4 p.m.), an award-winning 1990 film that combines visually and aurally dense tableaux with advanced motional control, optical printing, and animation techniques to depict the complex battle for natural resources waged between L.A. and the Owens Valley. Director Pat O'Neill is in attendance. "Films in Competition 6" (3:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, and narrative films by Jesse McClean, Lori Felker, and James Lowne, as well as Circle in the Sand, Michael Robinson's 2012 film, set in the near future during a 2nd American civil war, that follows a band of exiled political prisoners and their supervising soldiers who live in the ruins of a seaside military fort. "Suzan Pitt Retrospective Program Two" (7 p.m.). Second of two screenings of films by celebrated animator Pitt, who is in attendance. The program is highlighted by the world premiere of her latest film, Pinball "Films in Competition 7" (7:15 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. Suitcase of Love and Shame (9:15 p.m.). World premiere of this film that reconstructs a mesmerizing and erotic love story based on 60 hours of reel-to-reel 1960s audiotape (discovered in a suitcase) that chronicles the details of an adulterous affair between a Midwestern woman and her lover. Director Jane Gillooly is in attendance. "Films in Competition 8" (9:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. The films are followed by a FREE after party at the Last Word (301 W. Huron) from 11 p.m.-2 a.m.



Mar. 24: "Films in Competition 9," including animated and experimental films appropriate for kids ages 6 and up. $5, 11 a.m. "Regional Films in Competition," including narrative, experimental, and documentary films made in Michigan. $5, 11 a.m. "Music Video in Competition." FREE, UMMA Auditorium (525 S. State), noon. "Films in Competition 10" (1 p.m.), including new documentary and experimental films by Dani Leventhal, Mike Hoolboom, and others, as well as Spend It All, Les Blank's 1971 portrait of Cajun culture. The Radiant (1:30 p.m.), the Otolith Group's film, part of the AAFF competition, that explores the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake that triggered a tsunami and contributed to the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. Our Nixon (3:30 p.m.), H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and Dwight Chapin's documentary, part of the AAFF competition, that compiles previously unseen archival footage of Nixon's presidency, filmed by White House aides on Super 8 home movie cameras and subsequently seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation. "Award Program 1" (6 p.m.). "Award Program 2" (8 p.m.). Followed by an after party (10 p.m.-1 a.m.) at Arbor Brewing Company.

.
Michigan Theater (unless otherwise noted). Tickets: $95 (members, students, & seniors, $80) for the entire festival & $55 (members, students, & seniors, $45) for weekend passes in advance at aafilmfest.org, and $9 (students, seniors, & members, $7; midnight movies, $6) per evening show at the door. 995-5356. [map]
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 8 p.m.  Free! 

"Stealing Africa": Center of Light.

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This documentary is informative and investigates the age-old reality of how developing nations are flowing with natural resources, but retain little of the generated profit. While this is sadly not new, that Western nations are stealing resources, it is portrayed well in this film. Honing in on Swiss company, Glencore, Guldbrandsen depicts the shady development of the company, and how through transfer pricing they manage to retain billions of dollars in profit without having to pay their fair tax in Zambia. Join us for the documentary (55 min) and a discussion afterwards.
Center of Light, 200 Huronview Blvd. Free. 734-330-5048. revselena@centersoflight.org www.centersoflight.org [map]
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23

Saturday


March 2013
 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 

51st Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival.

  Ann Arbor Observer tree logo   < less

Mar. 19-24. The oldest and one of the most prestigious film festivals in North America features 6 days of film screenings, panel discussions, and parties that culminate in screenings of the award-winning films on Mar. 24. The competition showcases new experimental and independent 16-mm, 35-mm, and digital films and videos in a wide range of genres and of generally high quality. Past contributors have included Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Brian De Palma.



Mar. 23: Your Day Is My Night (11 a.m.), Lynne Sachs' documentary, part of the AAFF competition, in which residents of New York City's Chinatown tell their stories of personal and political upheaval. Central Park Five (noon), Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon's documentary that tells the story of 5 black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were arrested in 1989 and later wrongfully convicted of raping a white woman in Central Park. Followed by a discussion with Ken Burns, Raymond Santana (one of the "Five"), and Northwestern Center on Wrongful Convictions director Steve Drizin. "Films in Competition 5" (1 p.m.), including new films by Ana Vaz and Ben Rivers, the North American premiere of Stephen Connolly's Zabriskie Point (Redacted)--an impressionistic documentary that combines images of the eponymous location of Antonioni's 1970 film Zabriskie Point with contemporary research on the location and the film--and Bette Gordon and James Benning's 1975 conceptual bicentennial masterpiece The United States of America. Water and Power (4 p.m.), an award-winning 1990 film that combines visually and aurally dense tableaux with advanced motional control, optical printing, and animation techniques to depict the complex battle for natural resources waged between L.A. and the Owens Valley. Director Pat O'Neill is in attendance. "Films in Competition 6" (3:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, and narrative films by Jesse McClean, Lori Felker, and James Lowne, as well as Circle in the Sand, Michael Robinson's 2012 film, set in the near future during a 2nd American civil war, that follows a band of exiled political prisoners and their supervising soldiers who live in the ruins of a seaside military fort. "Suzan Pitt Retrospective Program Two" (7 p.m.). Second of two screenings of films by celebrated animator Pitt, who is in attendance. The program is highlighted by the world premiere of her latest film, Pinball "Films in Competition 7" (7:15 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. Suitcase of Love and Shame (9:15 p.m.). World premiere of this film that reconstructs a mesmerizing and erotic love story based on 60 hours of reel-to-reel 1960s audiotape (discovered in a suitcase) that chronicles the details of an adulterous affair between a Midwestern woman and her lover. Director Jane Gillooly is in attendance. "Films in Competition 8" (9:30 p.m.), including animated, experimental, documentary, and narrative films TBA. The films are followed by a FREE after party at the Last Word (301 W. Huron) from 11 p.m.-2 a.m.



Mar. 24: "Films in Competition 9," including animated and experimental films appropriate for kids ages 6 and up. $5, 11 a.m. "Regional Films in Competition," including narrative, experimental, and documentary films made in Michigan. $5, 11 a.m. "Music Video in Competition." FREE, UMMA Auditorium (525 S. State), noon. "Films in Competition 10" (1 p.m.), including new documentary and experimental films by Dani Leventhal, Mike Hoolboom, and others, as well as Spend It All, Les Blank's 1971 portrait of Cajun culture. The Radiant (1:30 p.m.), the Otolith Group's film, part of the AAFF competition, that explores the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake that triggered a tsunami and contributed to the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. Our Nixon (3:30 p.m.), H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and Dwight Chapin's documentary, part of the AAFF competition, that compiles previously unseen archival footage of Nixon's presidency, filmed by White House aides on Super 8 home movie cameras and subsequently seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation. "Award Program 1" (6 p.m.). "Award Program 2" (8 p.m.). Followed by an after party (10 p.m.-1 a.m.) at Arbor Brewing Company.

.
Michigan Theater (unless otherwise noted). Tickets: $95 (members, students, & seniors, $80) for the entire festival & $55 (members, students, & seniors, $45) for weekend passes in advance at aafilmfest.org, and $9 (students, seniors, & members, $7; midnight movies, $6) per evening show at the door. 995-5356. [map]
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 11:30 a.m. and 12:30, 1:30, 2:30, & 3:30 p.m. 

U-M Natural History Museum Planetarium Shows.

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Every Sat. & Sun. Two different audiovisual planetarium shows.

The Sky Tonight (11:30 a.m. Sat. & 1:30 p.m. both days) is an exploration of the current night sky.

Flight Adventures (Sat. 12:30 p.m & Sun. 2:30 p.m.) is an audiovisual show examining the science of flight through the eyes of a young girl and her grandfather as they explore how birds, kites, planes, and models fly and learn about the history and future of human flight.
Various times, Natural History Museum, 1109 Geddes at North University. $5. 764-0478. [map]
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 1-7:30 p.m.  Free! 

Chinese Documentary Film Series: U-M Center for Chinese Studies.

  Ann Arbor Observer tree logo   < less Ai WeiWei

Feb. 16: "The Revolutionary" (Irv Drasnin, Lucy Ostrander, & Don Sellers, 2011). Saul Rittenberg, a former GI Chinese language expert who stayed to become an active participant in the Chinese communist revolution and its aftermath, reflects on his life in China from the mod-1940s through the end of the Mao era.

Feb. 23: Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry (Alison Klayman, 2012). Portrait of China's most famous international artist and its most outspoken domestic critic. Mandarin & English, subtitles.

Mar. 16: When China Met Africa (Nick & Marc Francis, 2011). Exploration of China's expanding footprint in Africa through the stories of 3 people in Zambia: a Chinese farmer, a Chinese multinational's road project manager, and Zambia's trade minister. Mandarin & Zambian, subtitles.

Mar. 23: The Transition Period (Zhou Hao, 2009). A startlingly candid look inside the unsavory dynamics of Chinese politics at the local level seen through the eyes of a retiring Communist Party secretary in a rural inland province. Mandarin & Henan dialect, subtitles.

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7 p.m. Unless otherwise noted), Angell Hall Auditorium A (entrance at the Fishbowl on the east side of the bldg.) Free. 764-6308. [map]
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 7 p.m. 

"Bonsai People: The Vision of Muhammad Yunus": Whole Foods "Brew and View.".

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(Holly Mosher, 2011). Documentary about Nobel laureate Yunus, who popularized microloans to help small businesses. Cash bar. Proceeds benefit the Whole Planet Foundation.
7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.), Wolverine State Brewing Co., 2019 W. Stadium. $5 admission. [map]
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24

Sunday


March 2013
 11 a.m.-10 p.m. 

51st Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival.

  Ann Arbor Observer tree logo   < less

Mar. 19-24. The oldest and one of the most prestigious film festivals in North America features 6 days of film screenings, panel discussions, and parties that culminate in screenings of the award-winning films on Mar. 24. The competition showcases new experimental and independent 16-mm, 35-mm, and digital films and videos in a wide range of genres and of generally high quality. Past contributors have included Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Brian De Palma.



Mar. 24: "Films in Competition 9," including animated and experimental films appropriate for kids ages 6 and up. $5, 11 a.m. "Regional Films in Competition," including narrative, experimental, and documentary films made in Michigan. $5, 11 a.m. "Music Video in Competition." FREE, UMMA Auditorium (525 S. State), noon. "Films in Competition 10" (1 p.m.), including new documentary and experimental films by Dani Leventhal, Mike Hoolboom, and others, as well as Spend It All, Les Blank's 1971 portrait of Cajun culture. The Radiant (1:30 p.m.), the Otolith Group's film, part of the AAFF competition, that explores the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake that triggered a tsunami and contributed to the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. Our Nixon (3:30 p.m.), H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and Dwight Chapin's documentary, part of the AAFF competition, that compiles previously unseen archival footage of Nixon's presidency, filmed by White House aides on Super 8 home movie cameras and subsequently seized by the FBI during the Watergate investigation. "Award Program 1" (6 p.m.). "Award Program 2" (8 p.m.). Followed by an after party (10 p.m.-1 a.m.) at Arbor Brewing Company.

.
Michigan Theater (unless otherwise noted). Tickets: $95 (members, students, & seniors, $80) for the entire festival & $55 (members, students, & seniors, $45) for weekend passes in advance at aafilmfest.org, and $9 (students, seniors, & members, $7; midnight movies, $6) per evening show at the door. 995-5356. [map]
Bookmark and Share

 1:30, 2:30, & 3:30 p.m. 

U-M Natural History Museum Planetarium Shows.

  Ann Arbor Observer tree logo   < less

Every Sat. & Sun. Two different audiovisual planetarium shows.

The Sky Tonight (11:30 a.m. Sat. & 1:30 p.m. both days) is an exploration of the current night sky.

Flight Adventures (Sat. 12:30 p.m & Sun. 2:30 p.m.) is an audiovisual show examining the science of flight through the eyes of a young girl and her grandfather as they explore how birds, kites, planes, and models fly and learn about the history and future of human flight.
Various times, Natural History Museum, 1109 Geddes at North University. $5. 764-0478. [map]
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 1:30-2:30 p.m. 

"Michigan at War: The Struggle for the Old Northwest, 1812-1815": Ann Arbor Senior Center.

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(Chris Cook, 2012). Director Cook is on hand to introduce his fast-paced 30-minute educational documentary about the Michigan territory's role in the War of 1812.
1:30-2:30 p.m., Ann Arbor Senior Center, 1320 Baldwin. . $5 (seniors age 60 & older, $4; members & kids under 12 accompanied by an adult, free). 794-6250. [map]
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 3 p.m.  Free! 

"Fold Crumple Crush: The Art of El Anatsui": UMMA.

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Documentary, filmed over 3 years in Venice, Nsukka, and the U.S., about internationally renowned Nigerian artist El Anatsui, whose work is currently on display at UMMA. Also, a screening of Anatsui at Work: Eight Short Films, Vogel's 2011 collection of short, instructive documentaries that depict Anatsui demonstrating his artistic process and discussing his theories on specific media as he creates one of his most ambitious works in Nsukka and installs it on the façade of the Palazzo Fortuny Museum in Venice.
7 p.m. (Feb. 19 & Mar. 8) & 3 p.m. (Mar. 24), UMMA Auditorium, 525 S. State. Free. 764-0395. [map]
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Esquire Interiors Ann Arbor MI
Top of the Lamp, Ann Arbor's locally owned lighting specialty store.