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Calendar of Events

Tuesday, April 22, 2014






 
Who wrote this?   Ann Arbor Observer tree logo Observer editors    community member community members
 9-10 a.m. 

Preschool Story Time: Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum.

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Every Tues. All preschoolers, accompanied by an adult, invited for stories. Followed by a science activity.
9-10 a.m., AAHOM, 220 E. Ann. $11 regular admission (members & kids under age 2, free). 995-5439. [map]
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 9:30 a.m. 

Basic Yoga.

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This balanced practice uses traditional yoga posture and breath techniques to cultivate a balance of strength without tension, and calm clarity of mind and supports the immune, digestive and cardio-vascular systems, promotes healthy joints, and slows the aging process. Open to all experience levels.
Sun Moon Yoga Studio, 404 W. Huron St. $15. webguru@annarboryoga.com sun-moon-yoga.com [map]
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 9:45 a.m. & 1:15 p.m. 

Coffee Break: Ann Arbor Christian Reformed Church.

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Every Tues. when Ann Arbor Public Schools are in session. All women invited to study the Bible with other American and international women in small, informal groups. Also, Bible stories and fun activities for preschoolers, and child care provided for babies.
9:45-11:15 a.m. & 1:15-2:45 p.m., Ann Arbor Christian Reformed Church, 1717 Broadway. $15 for the year. 665-0105. [map]
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 10 a.m.  Free! 

Preschool Storytime: Nicola's Books.

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Every Tues. Recently retired Ann Arbor District Library branch manager Ieva Bates reads stories for preschoolers. Also, craft activities.
10 a.m., Nicola's, 2513 Jackson, Westgate shopping center. Free. 662-0600. [map]
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 10 a.m.  Free! 

"Tuesday Ride to Chelsea and Beyond": Ann Arbor Bicycle Touring Society.

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Every Tues., Apr.-Nov. Moderate-paced ride, 36-40 miles, to Chelsea for breakfast.
10 a.m. (Apr. & Nov.) & 9 a.m. (May, June, Sept., & Oct.), 8 a.m. (July & Aug.), Bird Hills Park parking lot, 1900 Newport Rd. Free. 996-8440. [map]
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 10:30 a.m.-noon 

Voices Valiant Adult Choir: U-M Music School Special Programs.

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Voices Valiant is a vocal music ensemble at the University of Michigan for adults over the age of 50. This chorus is designed for adults who: love to sing, enjoy learning through music, enjoy the social community that music can provide, want to improve their mental and physical health through music. There is no audition necessary.
Voices Valiant will rehearse in two cycles in 2014: Winter Cycle and Spring Cycle. Each cycle consists of 10 rehearsals and a performance. Whether you have experience reading music and singing in a choir, or if this is your first choral experience, you will enjoy being a member of this unique group.
Season Dates
Winter Cycle: January 7 - March 8, 2014 (Concert on March 8)
Spring Cycle: March 18 - May 17, 2014 (Concert on May 17)
Trinity Lutheran Church, 1400 W. Stadium Blvd. $100/cycle plus $25 music. 734-936-2660. smtd-youthandadult@umich.edu http://www.music.umich.edu/special_programs/adult/voices-valiant.htm [map]
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 10:30-11:15 a.m.  Free! 

"Babytime": Chelsea District Library.

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Every Tues. Staff present a program of songs, stories, and rhymes for kids under age 2 (accompanied by a caregiver). No siblings.
10:30-11:15 a.m., CDL KidSpot, 221 S. Main, Chelsea. Free. 475-8732. [map]
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 Noon-1 p.m.  Free! 

Noon Lecture Series: U-M Center for Chinese Studies.

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Talks by U-M and visiting scholars. Free sandwiches, cookies, & coffee served.

Sept. 23: "Captured Alive," a talk by U-M Confucius Institute director Joseph Lam about this classical Chinese opera (kunqu) about a ghost who strangles her human lover so that they may resume their illicit affair in hell.

Sept. 30: "Beyond Western Civilization: A Translingual Approach," a talk by U-M Chinese arts & cultures professor Sally Michaelson on what early modern English translations of Chinese terms and texts reveals about what English speakers did and did not comprehend concerning rule of law as we now understand it.

Oct. 7: Rutgers University Chinese literature professor Wendy Swartz discusses "The Intertextual Brush: Philosophy in Early Medieval Chinese Poetry."

Oct. 21: U-M Chinese Buddhism professor Benjamin Brose on "Xuanzang's Skull: Buddhism, Nationalism, and Diplomacy in Modern Asia."

Oct. 28: Washington University (St. Louis) art history & archaeology professor Kristina Kleutghen on "Imperial Illusions: Crossing Pictorial Boundaries in the Qing Palaces."

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Noon-1 p.m., 1636 SSWB, 1080 South University. Free. 764-6308. [map]
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 4 p.m. 

U-M Baseball vs. Bowling Green.

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4 p.m., Ray Fisher Stadium. Ticket prices TBA. 764-0247.
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 4:30-8:30 p.m.  Free! 

"Dungeons & Dragons": Chelsea District Library.

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Every Tues. & Thurs. All teens and adults invited to play this popular role-playing game.
4:30-8 p.m., CDL, 221 S. Main, Chelsea. Free. 475-8732. [map]
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 5 p.m.  Free! 

Earth Day: Climate Action Rally at UM: Clean Water Action and Earth Day: Climate Action.

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Climate change is real, it is happening now, and it is very, very dangerous. Come hear University of Michigan professors Knute Nadelhoffer and Richard Rood discuss the science and implications of global warming, and State Representative Jeff Irwin address the political challenges we face in dealing with it.
University of Michigan Central Campus, Ingalls Mall by the Burton Bell Tower. Free. 734-330-0163. erica.ackerman@gmail.com http://edca2014.org
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 6 p.m.  Free! 

"Doug & Suds Ride": Ann Arbor Bicycle Touring Society.

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Every Tues. Apr.-Oct. Fast/moderate-paced ride, 25-30 miles, to the west or north.
6 p.m., Aberdeen Bike & Fitness, 1101 S. Main, Chelsea. Free. 678-8297. [map]
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 6-8:30 p.m. 

Composting: The Ultimate Recycling: Lifelong Learning at Washtenaw Community College.

  community member   < less Compost improves soil, especially when planting vegetable beds.

Great soil is key to growing healthy plants, and compost makes soil great! Compost adds nutrients, reduces the need for fertilizer, and helps retain moisture. This class tells you everything you need to know to make compost out of kitchen scraps, leaves, and yard waste. You'll discover the correct ratio of ingredients, how to make and take care of a compost pile, how to troubleshoot problems, how to use the finished compost and how to make compost tea. Instructor is a master composter and master gardener volunteer.
You do not have to be enrolled as a WCC student to take this lifelong learning class. Washtenaw County residents age 65+ can join for free.
Washtenaw Community College, 4800 E Huron River Dr., Morris J. Lawrence Bldg, Rm. ML 130. $45. 734-975-6865. http://tinyurl.com/WCCcomposting [map]
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 6 p.m. 

Earth Day Celebration: The Creature Conservancy.

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Creature Conservancy staffers show and discuss several animals, including a two-toed tree sloth, a Parma wallaby, colorful macaws, and others. For adults and families with kids age 10 & up. Attendees are asked to bring a food donation for the animals; see website for specific requests.
6 p.m., Creature Conservancy, 4940 Ann Arbor-Saline Rd. $10 and a food donation; preregistration required at thecreatureconservancy.org/upcoming-events.html. 929-9324. [map]
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 6 p.m.  Free! 

LGBTQ Speak Out: SafeHouse Center.

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Survivors will share their personal stories of surviving sexual violence in a safe, confidential place. Speak Out empowers and honors survivors of sexual assault, sexual harassment, dating and domestic violence, and stalking by providing a safe space that allows survivors to find their voice and share their stories.
SafeHouse Center Education Center, 4100 Clark Rd. Free. (734) 973-0242. www.safehousecenter.org [map]
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 6 p.m.  Free! 

Story Time: Bookbound.

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Every Tues. & Thurs. Linda Zimmer reads stories for kids age 6 & under.
6 p.m. (Tues.) & 10:30 a.m. (Thurs.), Bookbound, 1729 Plymouth, Courtyard Shops. Free. 369-4345. [map]
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 6 p.m.  Free! 

"Focus on Women: Huron River Ride": Ann Arbor Bicycle Touring Society.

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Every Tues. Slow/moderate-paced ride, 18-30 miles, to Dexter and back. Geared especially, but not exclusively, for women new to riding.
6 p.m. (Apr.-Sept.) & 5:30 p.m. (Oct.), meet at Barton Park on Huron River Dr. 276-0240.
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 6:30 p.m. 

Yoga for Anxiety and Depression.

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Depressed or anxious moods cloud the joy of experiencing ourselves as perfect and whole. With or without a diagnosis heal with breath work, yoga postures and imagery to balance moods and awaken inner joy. Certified Teacher.
Sun Moon Yoga Studio, 404 W. Huron St. $15. webguru@annarboryoga.com sun-moon-yoga.com [map]
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 7 p.m.  Free! 

Earth Day Sing-Along: Love Songs For Our Planet.

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Join Lori Fithian, Jean Chorazyczewski and friends for a musical Earth Day Celebration. Songs, chants, rounds and jams with an Earthy groove will bring us together in reverence and celebration of our miraculous Mother Earth. Bring your favorite Earthy poem or short reading to share with the circle. All ages are welcome - come sing in our Earth Day Sing-for-the-Earth Choir!
First Unitarian Universalist Church of Ann Arbor, 4001 Ann Arbor-Saline Rd. Free. 734-426-7818. lorifithian@mac.com [map]
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 7-9:30 p.m. 

English Country Dancing: Ann Arbor Community of Traditional Music and Dance.

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Every Tues. Historical and traditional English dancing to live music. All dances taught. No partner or experience needed. Bring flat, nonslip shoes (running shoes OK). First-timers are asked to arrive at 7 p.m.
7-9:30 p.m., Chapel Hill Condominium clubhouse, 3350 Green Rd. (park on Burbank). $8 (students, $4; kids age 13 & under with a parent, free). 665-7704. [map]
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 7-9 p.m. 

Treetown Community Chorus.

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Every Tues. Sept. 9-Apr. 28. All invited to join this fun-loving independent local mixed chorus to sing mostly familiar tunes, along with some serious music, in various genres. David Perample directs.
7-9 p.m., Gladwin barn, 4105 W. Liberty. Free to visitors ($80 per semester dues for those who join). 355-7738. [map]
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 7 p.m 

Zounds Hearing Hitchcock Film Series: Michigan Theater Foundation.

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Feb. 2: The Pleasure Garden (Alfred Hitchcock, 1926) Silent drama about a chorus girl engaged to an adventurer who begins to play around when her fiancé travels out of the country. 2 p.m.

Feb. 4: Murder! (Alfred Hitchcock, 1930) A man convinced of the innocence of a woman he helped convict or murder sets out to find the real killer. Herbert Marshall, Norah Baring. 7 p.m.

Feb. 9: The 39 Steps (Alfred Hitchcock, 1935) Vintage mystery-romantic comedy about an innocent man pulled into the orbit of a spy ring. Robert Donat, Madeleine Carroll. 4 p.m.

Feb. 11: The Man Who Knew Too Much (Alfred Hitchcock, 1934) Hitchcock's original version of the thriller about criminals who kidnap a child to prevent her parents from revealing an assassination plot. Leslie Banks, Edna Best, Peter Lorre. 5 p.m.

Feb. 11: The Man Who Knew Too Much (Alfred Hitchcock, 1956) Remake of the 1934 thriller. James Stewart, Doris Day. 7 p.m.

Feb. 16: The Lodger (Alfred Hitchcock, 1926) A jealous detective accuses a lodger of murder. Ivor Novello, Malcolm Keen. 1:30 p.m.

Feb. 18: The Lady Vanishes (Alfred Hitchcock, 1938) Classic mystery-comedy about an old woman's baffling disappearance on a train that leads a young woman into a web of intrigue. Margaret Lockwood, Michael Redgrave. 7 p.m.

Feb. 23: Rebecca (Alfred Hitchcock, 1940) Gothic thriller about a na´ve young woman who marries an aristocratic widower. Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, Judith Anderson, George Sanders. 4 p.m.

Feb. 25: Foreign Correspondent (Alfred Hitchcock, 1940) Thriller about an American reporter who exposes enemy spies in Britain. Joel McCrea, Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, George Sanders. 7 p.m.

Mar. 2: The Ring (Alfred Hitchcock, 1927). Recently restored print of this silent boxing melodrama. With live organ accompaniment. 4 p.m.

Mar. 4: Suspicion (Alfred Hitchcock, 1941). A wealthy, sheltered woman marries a charming ne'er-do-well she comes to suspect may be planning to kill her for her money Joan Fontaine, Cary Grant. 7 p.m.

Mar. 9: Saboteur (Alfred Hitchcock, 1942). Offbeat thriller about a munitions worker wrongly accused of sabotage and forced to go on the lam around the country. Script written in part by Dorothy Parker. 5 p.m.

Mar. 11: Shadow of a Doubt (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943). A lively teen grows to suspect that her beloved uncle may be a serial killer. Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotton. 7 p.m.

Mar. 16: Lifeboat (Alfred Hitchcock, 1944). When a ship of Americans and Britons is sunk by a missile from a German U-boat during WWII, the survivors must cope with the elements--and each other. Tallulah Bankhead, William Bendix. 5 p.m.

Mar. 18: Spellbound (Alfred Hitchcock, 1945). The youthful new director of a posh mental asylum is not whom he claims to be. Gregory Peck, Ingrid Bergman. 7 p.m.

Mar. 23: Downhill (Alfred Hitchcock, 1927). Recently restored print of this silent melodrama about a boy whose life falls apart when he is expelled from school after he takes the blame for a friend's crime. With live organ accompaniment. 8 p.m.

Apr. 1: Notorious (Alfred Hitchcock, 1946). Thriller about a woman asked to spy on a group of Nazi friends n South America. Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant. 7 p.m.

Apr. 6: The Farmer's Wife (Alfred Hitchcock, 1928). Newly restored silent drama about a rough-mannered widowed farmer in search of a new bride. With live organ accompaniment. 1:30 p.m.

Apr. 8: Rope (Alfred Hitchcock, 1948). A detective sets out to solve a prep-school murder that turns out to be a killing for thrills. James Stewart. 7 p.m.

Apr. 13: Strangers on a Train (Alfred Hitchcock, 1951). Classic thriller about a psychotic mother's boy with a Raymond Chandler screenplay. 1:30 p.m.

Apr. 15: Dial M for Murder (Alfred Hitchcock, 1954). Classic thriller about a man hoisted in the petard of his plot to murder his wife. Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, Bob Cummings. 7 p.m.

Apr. 20: Easy Virtue (Alfred Hitchcock, 1928). See review. Newly restored silent drama, adapted from the Noel Coward play, about a divorcée who hides her scandalous past from her new husband and family. With live organ accompaniment. 5 p.m.

Apr. 22: Rear Window (Alfred Hitchcock, 1954). Stylish thriller-romance about a news photographer examining his neighbor's lives with binoculars and making a sordid discovery. James Stewart, Grace Kelly.7 p.m.

Apr. 27: The Trouble with Harry (Alfred Hitchcock, 1955). Trouble erupts in a small, quiet New England town when a man's body is found in the woods. Shirley MacLaine, John Forsythe, Edmund Gwenn. 4 p.m.

Apr. 29: The Wrong Man (Alfred Hitchcock, 1957). Offbeat film about a New York City jazz musician falsely accused of robbery. Henry Fonda, Vera Miles. 7 p.m.

May 4: Champagne (Alfred Hitchcock, 1928). Silent drama about a spoiled heiress who defies her father by running off to marry her lover. With live organ accompaniment. 5 p.m.

May 6: Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958).Haunting, dreamlike mystery thriller that stars James Stewart as a retired police detective who is afraid of heights. Kim Novak.7 p.m.

May 11: North by Northwest (Alfred Hitchcock, 1959). Classic thriller about an ad exec mistaken for a government agent who's relentlessly pursued halfway across the country. Cary Grant. Eva Marie Saint. 5 p.m.

May 13: Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960). Classic suspense thriller set in a motel run by a peculiar mama's boy. Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh. 5 p.m.

May 18: The Manxman (Alfred Hitchcock, 1929). Newly restored silent drama about lifelong friends on the Isle of Man, a fisherman and a lawyer, who are both attracted to the same woman. With live organ accompaniment. 4 p.m.

May 20: Family Plot (Alfred Hitchcock, 1976). Comedy-thriller about a con artist and her private investigator boyfriend who run into a couple of serial kidnappers. Barbara Harris, Bruce Dern, Karen Black. 5 p.m.

May 25: Blackmail (Alfred Hitchcock, 1929). Newly restored silent thriller about a Scotland Yard detective who discovers that a murder he is investigating was committed by his girlfriend while defending herself from a rapist. With live organ accompaniment. 1:30 p.m.

May 27: The Birds (Alfred Hitchcock, 1963). Eerie thriller about hordes of bloodthirsty sparrows, gulls, and crows plaguing a small California town. Not for the squeamish. Stars Tippi Hedren, Rod Taylor, Suzanne Pleshette, Jessica Tandy. 7 p.m.

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Various times, Michigan Theater. Tickets (unless otherwise noted): $10 (children under 12, students with ID, seniors age 55 & older, & U.S. veterans, $8; MTF members, $7.50; films before 6 p.m., $7). 668-TIME. [map]
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 7-9 p.m. 

"Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time": Zingerman's Roadhouse.

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Chef Alex Young is joined by culinary historian and Southern Foodways Alliance board member Adrian Miller host a full-course meal of recipes from Miller's book, who explores how each of several dishes-fried chicken, chitlins, yams, greens, "red drinks," and more-got onto the soul food plate and what it means for African American culture and identity.
7-9 p.m., Zingerman's Roadhouse, 2501 Jackson. $100 (beverages not included). Space limited; reservations required. 663-FOOD. [map]
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 7-8:30 p.m. 

"The Yukon: Canada's Wild West": Ann Arbor District Library.

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National Geographic writer and photojournalist Tom Clynes discusses his new book.
7-8:30 p.m., AADL 4th-floor meeting room, 343 S. Fifth Ave. Free. 327-4555. [map]
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 7-9 p.m.  Free! 

"WomanSafeHealth: The Antidote to Status Quo Health Care": Crazy Wisdom Bookstore & Tea Room Book Discussion.

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Local obstetrician-gynecologist Elizabeth Shadigian discusses her new book. Signing.
7-9 p.m., Crazy Wisdom, 114 S. Main. Free. 665-2757. [map]
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 7:30 p.m.  Free! 

Annual Holy Week Concert: Our Own Thing Chorale.

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U-M music professor emeritus Willis Patterson directs this popular local choir in a program of spirituals and Easter music. Note: Moved from April 15.
7:30 p.m., Church of the Good Shepherd, 2145 Independence Blvd. Free; donations accepted. [map]
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 7:30-9 p.m.  Free! 

In the Doctor's Office: Recovery Friend or Foe?: Dawn Farm.

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"In the Doctor's Office: Recovery Friend or Foe?" will be presented by Mark A. Weiner, MD; Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine; and Matthew Statman, LMSW, CAADC; Collegiate Recovery Program Manager, University of Michigan Health Services. It's been said that the doctor's office can a dangerous place for people in recovery from addiction. It's also been said that recovering people are terrible patients. This program will discuss whether these statements are fair and why doctors and other healthcare providers are essential allies for long term recovery. We will describe in detail how recovering people can take responsibility for their physical health and how to recruit health care providers as allies. This program is part of the Dawn Farm Education Series, a FREE series developed to provide accurate, helpful, hopeful, practical, current information about chemical dependency, recovery, and related issues. Anyone with a personal or professional interest is welcome.
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Education Center Auditorium, 5305 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti. Free. 734-485-8725. info@dawnfarm.org http://www.dawnfarm.org/programs/education-series [map]
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 7:30-9 p.m.  Free! 

Temple Beth Emeth Spirituality Book Club.

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Apr. 22 & 24 (choose one). All invited to discuss Rami Shapiro's The Way of Solomon: Finding Joy and Contentment in the Wisdom of Ecclesiastes.
7:30-9 p.m. (Apr. 22) & noon-1 p.m. (Apr. 24), TBE, 2309 Packard. Free. cantorannie@gmail.com, 665-4744. [map]
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 8 p.m.  Free! 

U-M Dance Department Choreography, Performance, Production and Design Concert.

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An evening of original choreography by U-M dance grad students Eryn Rosenthal, Patty Solorzano, and Marcus White.
8 p.m. (doors open at 7 p.m.), U-M Dance Bldg. Studio A, 1310 North University Ct. Free. 763-5460. [map]
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 8 p.m.  Free! 

"Fresh Darkness": University Philharmonia Orchestra.

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Christopher James Lees conducts this U-M music student ensemble in the world premiere of a work by U-M alum David Biedenbender as well as Tchaikovsky's rich and dark tone poem Francesca da Rimini. Preceded at 7:15 p.m. in the lower lobby by a lecture on the program.
8 p.m., Hill Auditorium. Free. 764-0594. [map]
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 9-10:30 p.m.  Free! 

"Objects as Stage: Dancing the Façade of Angell Hall": U-M Institute for the Humanities.

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Dance party with a DJ and laser projections illuminating the Angell Hall columns.
9-10:30 p.m., Angell Hall courtyard, 435 S. State. Free. 936-3518. [map]
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Esquire Interiors Ann Arbor MI
Top of the Lamp, Ann Arbor's locally owned lighting specialty store.