Click for Ann Arbor, Michigan Forecast
Saturday March 25, 2017
Follow us: facebook twitter RSS feed

Everyone's a Critic

The Observer's culture blog

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

LIFE CHAIN, by Iris Hanlin

Life Chain in Ann Arbor, October 2013

On October 6, a cool, overcast Sunday afternoon, the intersection of Huron Parkway and Washtenaw Ave. in Ann Arbor was lined with over 250 pro-life activists for National Life Chain Sunday 2013. From 2 to 3:30 p.m., men, women, and children of all walks of life stood on the public sidewalks, holding signs including those which read “Women Do Regret Abortion,” “Adoption: The Loving Option,” “Defend Life,” as well as signs with numbers to various crisis pregnancy help lines.

“I think it’s important to put a smile, and a happiness, and a positive face to the pro life movement,” says Heidi Bratton, mother of 6, ranging from age 5 to 23. “Because life is good.”

Barb Brown, who works with the youth of Gabriel Richard High School in Ann Arbor agrees, and believes the public display of the Life Chain adds an important element in raising awareness of the cause and the issue at hand. “I think it’s important that an issue this big in our nation is kept in the eye of the public, and this is one of the most family friendly ways to do it,” she said. “It doesn’t have to be confrontational. It can be peaceful and prayerful.”

Here in Ann Arbor, pro-lifers are trying especially to reach the students of the University of Michigan. “We are here to stand up for life and for babies,” says Paul Dobrowolski, regional director for the Ann Arbor chapter of 40 Days for Life. “I believe this is the perfect place to be – right in the heart of liberal Midwest. We need to get the word out – there is a lot of laissez-faire feelings in this town, and we are here to get people motivated, and to let people know these are human beings in the womb.”

Half the crowd was young people, who believed their presence was just as important. “The young people are the fire, and I feel like when young people are out here, people can see it’s just not older people,” says Brigid Lennon, 17, of Ann Arbor.

Life Chain is devoted to prayer and peaceful, family-friendly protest. Life Chains occur in other nations on different dates, and all Chains make a point of remaining peaceful. More than 20,000 Chains have been held worldwide this far, and no known pro-lifer has been cited or arrested.

Ann Arbor’s Life Chain was one in over 1550 cities and towns in the U.S. and Canada, who, again this year, proclaimed the irrefutable message of the pro-life movement: Human life is to be valued and protected from the moment of conception. Participants credit the faithful assistance of God, and praise him with grateful hearts.

For more information on Life Chain, visit www.LifeChain.net or www.NationalLifeChain.org.


posted by John Hilton at 4:59 p.m. | 0 comments


0 comments:

Post a comment:

LIFE CHAIN, by Iris Hanlin:

Your e-mail address: (will not be shown)

Your name: (optional)

Please enter the word hello here, to show that you are a human and not a spam robot:

Blog comments are reviewed and edited by the Observer staff and are not guaranteed to be shown on the website.

Previous Posts


You might also like:

Spring's First Flower - Savoring skunk cabbage Spring's First Flower - Savoring skunk cabbage
Crime Map Crime Map
Photo: Streetcar on Stadium Photo: Streetcar on Stadium
Map of Museums Map of Museums
From Restaurant to Barbershop - Ahmad Mourad re... From Restaurant to Barbershop - Ahmad Mourad re...
OWS Canines - Dogs and their owners take a bow. OWS Canines - Dogs and their owners take a bow.
Magic Pond Magic Pond
Calendar This Week - Food & Beverage Calendar This Week - Food & Beverage
Map of Restaurants with Senior Discounts Map of Restaurants with Senior Discounts
Creative Product Names - Table talk: March 2017 Creative Product Names - Table talk: March 2017
Regent Hotel
custom blinds and window treatments, flooring, and furniture
top of the lamp. All your in home lighting needs.
The Brain Injury Association of Michigan
A visitor's guide to Ann Arbor