Ann Arbor Observer cover
 Design In  Snow
Ann Arbor Weather:
Sunday January 21, 2018
Follow us: facebook twitter RSS feed
Print Comment E-mail

The Appleseed Collective 2011

 

continued

Brown, Smith, and Tulip took turns on lead vocals, with Russo chiming in as well, but the band was at its best when multiple vocalists were involved. They played two well-chosen covers, "Some of These Days," a song Sophie Tucker made popular in 1911, and "My Life Will Be Sweeter Someday," an old gospel song. But most of the music is their own, impressive for a band that's only been together for a matter of months. Four songs they played that night were brand new and had never been performed in front of an audience before. Smith says that he, Brown, and Tulip all write songs and that they all also brought compositions they'd been working on into the band. The songs are well written, and musically the band is fast and loose--in a good way--and capable of changing tempo with ease. The Appleseed Collective is young, talented, full of energy, and playing a type of music that is hardly in abundance in southeast Michigan. And the washboard is a very underrated instrument.

The Appleseed Collective headlines a show at the Blind Pig Saturday, June 18.    (end of article)

[Originally published in June, 2011.]

 

Bookmark and Share
previous  ·  1 l 2 l 3
all on one page
read more stories here -> Marketplace  l  Culture  l  Community  l  News

You might also like:

Logan
Never out of style
Lee Lawrence
Environmental Reprieve
The EPA lab is spared, but GLRI is still a Trump target.
James Leonard
Jessica Prozinski
Anti-Trump activist
Sabine Bickford
Millage Wins
"Andy LaBarre and Jerry Clayton are geniuses!" exclaims Ann Arbor councilmember Chip Smith
James Leonard
Goldfish in West Park?
Question Corner: November 2017
Tim Athan
Arts Series
Crime Map
A clickable, zoomable map
Nightspots: Crazy Wisdom Tea Room
Southeastern Michigan Trout Council
Fake ad update: Winter 2017 Community Observer
Jay Forstner
Winter at Delonis
Dan Kelly gets the warming shelter ready.
Eve Silberman
University of Michigan Museum of Art