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Monday November 20, 2017
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The Act of Killing

 

continued

into a massacre fueled by communal hatreds. The best estimates of the carnage hold that between 500,000 and a million Indonesians were killed, but the entire subject remains a sensitive one in Indonesia, and no systematic accounting of what took place has ever been carried out.

Enter Joshua Oppenheimer, an American documentary filmmaker based in Denmark. A fluent Indonesian speaker who had come to southeast Asia to investigate the effects of globalization, he began to interview those responsible for the killings and found many of them proud of their roles because they believed they had stopped Communism in Indonesia. The killers from that time--small-time thugs, essentially--agreed to reenact the murders for Oppenheimer, who has said that his method "was not an elaborate lure to get them to open up. The method was a response to their openness." He told them that he would film whatever they wanted to present.

So far, the banality of evil. But then it gets surreal. The film focuses mostly on a death squad leader in Sumatra named Anwar Congo, who recalled that the original killers imitated murder scenes from American films--and in fact were annoyed in the beginning that the previous left-leaning government had discouraged American film imports. Congo sets himself up as a director of the reenactment, casting the killings as gangster film scenes. His favorite method was to strangle a victim with a wire. Congo throws in Western sequences and even a song-and-dance routine in the countryside. The violence of American culture hangs over the scenes like a bad dream--and the extent to which the CIA was involved in the killings remains under debate.

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