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Saturday February 24, 2018
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Paisley Rekdal

 

continued

But these are first and finally poems. We read them to watch the play of an exceptional imagination, to hear the sounds captured by one practiced ear. Near the end of Animal Eye, in the poem "Dragonfly," Rekdal describes a tiny diaphanous dragonfly until she arrives at "wings almost too thin / to be seen but still / must be believed in," and the reader realizes this poet has taken him to a very different place. What had been a description of the mating odonates has become a way to confront some essential questions:

How to solidify

this barely imaginable:

to scrape and name and tear

until something inviolable

can be reached,

one point around which

everything else might fix

itself in opposition, calling it love

each time it happens,

pale yellow silvering

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