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Friday April 18, 2014
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Madame XD

 

continued

Drive. Next to her were two men, one with a guitar, one with a mandolin. Amid a riot of birdsong, they began to play — bluegrass with a strange and haunting twist. The instrument Xiao Dong played was not quite a fiddle, though I couldn't exactly tell what was different about it. She sang, in both English and Mandarin — in a haunting, powerful, nuanced voice.

Soon an odd, pounding rhythm could be heard. I looked west and saw a tall, dark man running down the road, his feet slapping the asphalt. He was very fast. By this time the music was filling the air, but he didn't seem to notice. Along came another runner — then another and another. (This was, I soon realized, the Dexter-Ann Arbor Run.) Soon there were throngs of runners, and they heard the music, turned, smiled, and shouted, "Thank you!" Xiao Dong nodded and smiled and played on.

Born in China, Xiao Dong began studying the erhu (that thing that was not quite a fiddle) with her father at the age of five. At eleven, she was accepted to the prestigious Central Conservatory of Music and made the 1,200-mile move to Beijing, where she went on to earn her degree and graduate as a "master" of the erhu, with a minor in classical piano.

She went on to a varied professional career before moving in 2005 to Detroit, where she reached out to explore and embrace the music of the area. How do bluegrass, folk, rock, and punk interact with the erhu, and with traditional and not-so-traditional Chinese songs? You never know until you try.

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