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Tuesday July 29, 2014
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Growing Pretty

 

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from what it's not about. How often do you see a story of a woman that is rich with romance and yet doesn't ultimately revolve around her romantic choices?

Lucy (Stacie Hadgikosti) spends a large part of her time onstage in a deeply complex love affair with her mentor, which eventually ends, leaving her neither victimized nor hardened. She's not torn between irreconcilable longings for family and career. As the play ends, she is entering middle age with grace and satisfaction at where her art has taken her, and we have no idea what state her romantic life is in. This story arc is an odd and lopsided one for women, bucking the Jane Austen rule that a young woman's romantic choices will determine the course of her life. The final scene strikes with a kind of stealth brilliance when you find out that Growing Pretty is not a play about How I Met My Husband, or Why I Can Never Love Again. It's a play about struggle and reward in other realms.

Hadgikosti wears the role as if it's welded to her bare skin, and she grabs you from the opening monologue. When the curtain rises, she's sitting cross-legged on a bare stage, clearly preparing to address the audience for a while. It's a tough gig to pull off, like starting a song on high C, but she has an openness and directness that make her irresistibly watchable even when she's on stage alone.

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