Click for Ann Arbor, Michigan Forecast
Thursday May 25, 2017
Follow us: facebook twitter RSS feed
Print Comment E-mail

Remembering D-Day

 

continued

"We had no idea what an invasion was really like," Fournier recalls. After practice runs loading and unloading equipment, he and his fellow navy construction troops "were pretty cocky." Waiting on a barge while fighting raged six miles away on Omaha Beach, his buddies played pinochle while Fournier watched for the flashing lights that would summon them into history.

When the battalion finally landed near dusk, Fournier stumbled and fell over what he quickly realized was a corpse. "Charlie's had a hard day," one of the GIs joked. "Everyone laughed," Fournier says, "to keep from crying."

Their first task, the next morning, was graves detail. About 3,000 young Americans died on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day. Fournier's Seabees picked up the bodies--"all shot up, maybe the legs missing and the arms missing"--and delivered them to freshly dug graves.

Bookmark and Share
previous  ·  1 l 2 l 3 l 4 l 5 l 6 l 7  ·  next page
all on one page
read more stories here -> Marketplace  l  Culture  l  Community  l  News

You might also like:

Ma Lou's
Ypsi chicken
Lee Lawrence
Roadside Cooking
Peeking at BBQ pits
Bob & Jorja Feldman
Comedy
Smarty-pants Wanted
Popular smackdown seeks new host.
Steve Daut
Ecology
Crime Map
A clickable, zoomable map
Photo: HRRamblers
Restaurants where Outdoor Seating Is Available
A clickable zoomable map
Subscribe to the Ann Arbor Observer
Tides of Change
Living history on Water Hill
Dale DeVoss
Arbor Hospice Palliative Care
Volik championship May 22 to 28
spark ann arbor